Skip to main content

Notification on January 01, 2020

On 1st January 2020, a notification was released, which stated that all book publishing houses, distributing houses, and authors who fully or partially own their copyright and/or use the copyright symbol or have an ISBN and/or ISBN barcode in their book must obtain a certificate of copyright from INTERNATIONAL COPYRIGHT AND INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS ORGANIZATION (ICRIPRO) if the book has been published internationally in more than one country or on any international platform. This notification created a lot of buzz in the publishing industry, and there were mixed reactions from authors and publishers alike. he notification also stated that failure to obtain the certificate could result in legal action being taken against the author or publisher.

The notification had several implications for authors and publishers. Firstly, it meant that authors and publishers had to pay a fee to obtain the certificate of copyright from INTERNATIONAL COPYRIGHT AND INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS ORGANIZATION (ICRIPRO). This fee varied depending on the country of publication and the number of copies sold. 

Secondly, it meant that authors and publishers had to go through the registration process, which could be time-consuming and complex. Thirdly, it meant that authors and publishers had to keep track of their book's international sales and platforms, which could be challenging. 

The notification also had implications for readers. With the new requirement, the cost of producing and distributing books could increase. This could lead to higher prices for readers, making books less accessible to some. Furthermore, the requirement could make it more difficult for authors to publish their work internationally, as the cost of obtaining the certificate of copyright could be prohibitive.

The response to the notification was mixed. Some authors and publishers welcomed the requirement, as it added an extra layer of protection for their work. They felt that the fee was reasonable and that the registration process was straightforward. Others, however, were critical of the requirement. 

They felt that it was an unnecessary burden on authors and publishers, and that the fee was too high. Some also felt that the requirement was unfair to self-published authors, who would have to bear the cost of obtaining the certificate themselves. Critics of the requirement also argued that it could stifle creativity and innovation. 

They felt that the requirement would discourage authors from publishing internationally, as the cost of obtaining the certificate of copyright could be prohibitive. This could lead to a decrease in the diversity of voices and perspectives in the publishing industry.

Ultimately, the requirement could have a significant impact on the accessibility and diversity of the publishing industry. It remains to be seen how this requirement will be implemented and enforced and what its long-term effects will be. Nonetheless, it is essential for authors and publishers to understand the implications of this requirement and take steps to comply with it if necessary.








Comments

Popular posts from this blog

World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) vs. INTERNATIONAL COPYRIGHT AND INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS ORGANIZATION (ICRIPRO)

The protection of intellectual property rights is of paramount importance for individuals and businesses alike, as it provides legal recognition and protection of their creations, innovations, and brands. Two prominent international organizations that work towards the protection of intellectual property rights are the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) and the International Copyright and Intellectual Property Rights Organization (ICRIPRO). This article seeks to highlight the differences between these two organizations and the services they offer.  WIPO is a specialized agency of the United Nations that was established in 1967, with a mandate to promote the protection of intellectual property (IP) worldwide. WIPO provides a range of services that help individuals and businesses protect their IP rights globally. These services include the registration of patents, trademarks, and industrial designs, as well as the administration of various international treaties and agreement

Comparison between Domestic IPR Registration Vs. ICRIPRO Registration

Domestic IPR registration refers to the process of registering intellectual property rights within a single country, whereas ICRIPRO registration involves registering intellectual property rights on an international level. Intellectual property rights (IPR) are a valuable asset for businesses and individuals alike. They provide legal protection for creative and innovative works, such as inventions, designs, trademarks, and copyrighted works. However, the protection of intellectual property rights is often limited to a single country, which can pose a challenge for businesses operating on an international scale.  This is where International Copyright and Intellectual Property Rights Organization (ICRIPRO) registration comes in. ICRIPRO is an international organization that offers registration services for a variety of intellectual property rights, including patents, trademarks, copyrights, industrial designs, geographical indications, and trade secrets. By registering with ICRIPRO, busi

Industrial Designs - Register Today at International level with INTERNATIONAL COPYRIGHT AND INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS ORGANIZATION (ICRIPRO)

Industrial designs refer to the ornamental or aesthetic aspects of a product, such as its shape, pattern, or color scheme. Protecting industrial designs is important for businesses to maintain their brand identity and prevent competitors from copying their designs and benefiting from their reputation. International protection of industrial designs through the International Copyright and Intellectual Property Rights Organization (ICRIPRO) is essential for companies operating in multiple jurisdictions, as it provides a centralized platform for registration and protection of industrial designs at a global level.  The importance of international industrial design protection through ICRIPRO can be seen from a number of perspectives -  Legal protection: By registering industrial designs with ICRIPRO, companies can obtain legal protection for their designs in multiple countries. This can be particularly important for companies operating in multiple jurisdictions, where the legal requirements